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Archive for the ‘antenna’ Category

postheadericon Research shocker! Keyless car entry systems can be hacked easily, elegantly

We know you are vigilant enough not to trust your car’s security to a wireless system, but plenty of other folks like the convenience of putting away the metallic keys and getting into their vehicles with a bit of Bond-like swagger. Professor Srdjan Capkun of ETH Zurich found himself perched on the fence between these two groups when he recently purchased a vehicle with a keyless entry system, so he did what any good researcher would: he tried to bypass its security measures. In total, he and his team tested 10 models from eight car makers and their results were pretty conclusive: each of the tested vehicles was broken into and driven away using a very simple and elegant method. Keyless entry systems typically work by sending a low-powered signal from the car to your key fob, with the two working only when they’re near each other, but the wily Zurich profs were able to intercept and extend that signal via antennas acting as repeaters, resulting in your key activating your car even when it’s nowhere near it. The signal-repeating antennae have to be pretty close to both the key and the car, but that’s why heist movies stress the importance of teamwork. Hit the source link for all the chilling details.

Research shocker! Keyless car entry systems can be hacked easily, elegantly originally appeared on Engadget on Sun, 16 Jan 2011 19:07:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink CNET  |  sourceMIT Technology Review  | Email this | Comments

postheadericon Research shocker! Keyless car entry systems can be hacked easily, elegantly

We know you are vigilant enough not to trust your car’s security to a wireless system, but plenty of other folks like the convenience of putting away the metallic keys and getting into their vehicles with a bit of Bond-like swagger. Professor Srdjan Capkun of ETH Zurich found himself perched on the fence between these two groups when he recently purchased a vehicle with a keyless entry system, so he did what any good researcher would: he tried to bypass its security measures. In total, he and his team tested 10 models from eight car makers and their results were pretty conclusive: each of the tested vehicles was broken into and driven away using a very simple and elegant method. Keyless entry systems typically work by sending a low-powered signal from the car to your key fob, with the two working only when they’re near each other, but the wily Zurich profs were able to intercept and extend that signal via antennas acting as repeaters, resulting in your key activating your car even when it’s nowhere near it. The signal-repeating antennae have to be pretty close to both the key and the car, but that’s why heist movies stress the importance of teamwork. Hit the source link for all the chilling details.

Research shocker! Keyless car entry systems can be hacked easily, elegantly originally appeared on Engadget on Sun, 16 Jan 2011 19:07:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink CNET  |  sourceMIT Technology Review  | Email this | Comments

postheadericon Verizon’s iPhone 4 has a CDMA-specific antenna, no other changes made

Would you look at that, Verizon’s iPhone 4 has four notches punctuating its external antenna array — one more than you may find on AT&T’s version, with the top notch migrating to the side. Before you all jump on conspiracy theories about fixes and such, Tim Cook has just confirmed on stage that changes had to be made to work on the CDMA network, meaning that for users this is pretty much an aesthetic alteration. Otherwise, you’re looking at an almost identical device to what AT&T users have been enjoying since June of last year — savvy nerds will just be able to tell the CDMA version apart at one glance.

Verizon’s iPhone 4 has a CDMA-specific antenna, no other changes made originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 11 Jan 2011 11:17:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |   | Email this | Comments

postheadericon Verizon’s iPhone 4 has a CDMA-specific antenna, no other changes made

Would you look at that, Verizon’s iPhone 4 has four notches punctuating its external antenna array — one more than you may find on AT&T’s version, with the top notch migrating to the side. Before you all jump on conspiracy theories about fixes and such, Tim Cook has just confirmed on stage that changes had to be made to work on the CDMA network, meaning that for users this is pretty much an aesthetic alteration. Otherwise, you’re looking at an almost identical device to what AT&T users have been enjoying since June of last year — savvy nerds will just be able to tell the CDMA version apart at one glance.

Verizon’s iPhone 4 has a CDMA-specific antenna, no other changes made originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 11 Jan 2011 11:17:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |   | Email this | Comments

postheadericon Apple applies for ‘logo antenna’ patent, hides your resonator behind the brand indicator

Apple applies for 'logo antenna' patent, hides your resonator behind the brand indicator

Embedding an antenna in the external body of a phone? Maybe not such a good idea. Hiding it behind the logo sounds a little more practical, and that’s the idea Apple wrote up in a patent application dated June 17th, 2009, back before we knew antennas and gates could be so wickedly conjoined. That was also before we knew about the iPad, which seems to have one of these so-called “logo antennas” within it, as found when iFixit did their dirty thing. The same can be said for iMacs, which also have antennas peering through an apple-shaped hole to avoid any reception issues caused by an aluminum chassis. It looks to be a good solution, but not exactly a novel one. In roaming around the USPTO archives we found a similar 2003 patent from Dell also called “Logo Antenna,” the big difference being that while Apple’s logo forms a window for the antenna the logo in Dell’s patent actually is the antenna.

Apple applies for ‘logo antenna’ patent, hides your resonator behind the brand indicator originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 24 Dec 2010 09:05:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink Patently Apple  |  sourceUSPTO  | Email this | Comments