Buy ASIC Bitcoin Miner
Gadgets For Geeks
Add This Feed
Subscribe in Bloglines

Subscribe in NewsGator Online
Add to My AOL
Add to netvibes
Add to The Free Dictionary

Add to Excite MIX
Add to netomat Hub
Add to fwicki
Add to Webwag
Add to Plusmo
Add to Google Reader or Homepage
Categories

Archive for the ‘Arduino’ Category

postheadericon NAVI hack uses a Kinect to let the blind see, wear awesome headgear (video)

NAVI hack uses a Kinect to let the blind see, wear awesome headgear (video)

They’re getting ever more practical, these Kinect hacks. Two days ago it was creating 3D models in free-space, today it’s letting the blind see. Well, not really see, but better navigate through and stay informed about their environment, at least. A Kinect is attached to a helmet and connected to a backpack-mounted Dell laptop. Also connected to the laptop is an Ardunio-controlled belt that has three separate regions of vibration and a Bluetooth headset of the “obnoxious guy talking loudly to his stock broker on the train” variety. Finally, thanks to a little C#, the whole package allows someone to walk down a hall and receive verbal and tactile notifications of obstacles in their path. Wearers can also receive navigation to different areas and, thanks to ARToolKit identifiers stuck on the walls, even have signs read to them. It’s called NAVI (Navigational Aids for the Visually Impaired), created by Michael Zöllner and Stephan Huber at the University of Konstanz, and it’s all demonstrated for you below. Dig that hat, man. Dig that hat.

Continue reading NAVI hack uses a Kinect to let the blind see, wear awesome headgear (video)

NAVI hack uses a Kinect to let the blind see, wear awesome headgear (video) originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 17 Mar 2011 14:07:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink SlashGear  |  sourceUniversity of Konstanz  | Email this | Comments

postheadericon Controlling Ableton with a Danger Shield

Eric Ameres of Troy, NY, has a quick tutorial on how you can control music sequencer Ableton Live with a Danger Shield and Arduino.

postheadericon And the Winners Are….

We had two giveaways close last night.

In the Make: Arduino Getting Started with Arduino Kit giveaway, the winner is:

Fractal LLC

Thanks to all who participated (we had over 600 entries) and thanks to Maker Shed for providing this great kit.

In the Mechanics Skill Set giveaway of Dustyn Roberts’ Making Things Move, the three winners are:

Rob Colby
fburdett
Raven Varela

Thanks to all who entered this drawing and thanks to Dustyn and McGraw-Hill for the books!

To all four of the winners: Email me your mailing addresses and I’ll send out your winnings!

postheadericon Interactive Fountain Tracks Passersby

And, depending on how you position the nozzles, sprays them! More coolness from Gerry Chu, whose Kinect-based Motion Emotions I hit yesterday. Gerry’s fountain prototype has at least two Arduino Megas for brains.

More:

postheadericon RoboTouch brings a wired NES controller to a wireless iPad (video)

RoboTouch brings wired NES controllers to a wireless iPad

Oh Arduino, is there anything you can’t do when put in the right hands? The hands in this case belong to a guy named Joven of ProtoDojo, and they whipped up the contraption you can see in the video below. Basically, it’s a wired NES controller that goes to an Arduino board, which in turn controls a set of servos. Those servos articulate conductive arms to touch the screen in just the right places. The whole contraption enables a rather playable version of Reckless Racing, making it feel all the more like the RC Pro Am successor it’s trying to be. Check it out in the video below, and then hope that Jovan hurries up and posts the instructions so we can start building our own.

[Thanks, Chad]

Continue reading RoboTouch brings a wired NES controller to a wireless iPad (video)

RoboTouch brings a wired NES controller to a wireless iPad (video) originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 15 Mar 2011 15:16:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |  sourceProtoDojo (YouTube)  | Email this | Comments