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Archive for the ‘battery’ Category

postheadericon Lenovo ThinkPad X220 review

Admit it, when you look at the picture above, all you really see is a laptop with a design that hasn’t changed much in the last ten years. It’s true, based on its professional aesthetic alone, the ThinkPad X220 can’t really be distinguished from the other X Series laptops Lenovo’s released pretty much on an annual cycle, but there’s much more than meets the eye with that there ultraportable. The 12.5-inch machine is filled to the brim with the latest and greatest technology, including a new Intel Sandy Bridge Core i5 processor, an IPS display, and a six-cell battery. And if you look even closer, Lenovo’s made some small tweaks to the touchpad and keyboard, which make more difference than you’d ever think. The point is, that all-too-familiar ThinkPad can deceive you with its boring business looks, but it’s arguably one of the best laptops we’ve ever tested. Hit the break to find out why we think it’s so laudable.

Continue reading Lenovo ThinkPad X220 review

Lenovo ThinkPad X220 review originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 18 Mar 2011 17:19:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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postheadericon YikeBike extender battery backpack keeps you riding in, um, style for six more miles

Okay, so you’ll probably still look like a circus bear on a penny-farthing when you hop on the YikeBike, but with the introduction of the new extender battery backpack, you won’t have to stop every six miles to juice up. You heard right, this otherwise inconspicuous knapsack is actually packing a second YikeBike battery, which can be hooked up directly to the collapsible bicycle to keep you riding for another six miles — and if you like riding high on a tiny bike for long distances, it’s got room for more than one. So go crazy, pack this thing full of batteries and hit the road, but if your keister starts smartin’, don’t say we didn’t warn you. You can get your YikeBike juice on for $229 at the source link below.

YikeBike extender battery backpack keeps you riding in, um, style for six more miles originally appeared on Engadget on Sat, 12 Mar 2011 23:57:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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postheadericon New phase-change memory gets boost from carbon nanotubes, puts PRAM claims to shame

We’ve been hearing about the potential flash killer for years, and now a team of University of Illinois engineers is claiming that its new phase-change technology could make the PRAM of our dreams look quaint by comparison. Like so many groundbreaking discoveries of late, carbon nanotubes are at the heart of the this new mode of memory, which uses 100x less power than its phase-change predecessors. So, how does it work? Basically, the team replaced metal wires with carbon nanotubes to pump electricity through phase-change bits, reducing the size of the conductor and the amount of energy consumed. Still too much technobabble? How ’bout this — they’re using tiny tubes to give your cellphone juice for days. Get it? Good.

[Thanks, Jeff]

New phase-change memory gets boost from carbon nanotubes, puts PRAM claims to shame originally appeared on Engadget on Sat, 12 Mar 2011 15:22:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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postheadericon Sony VAIO S arrives stateside, brings along an advanced extended battery

Oh, you were worried Sony wasn’t going to release its new VAIO S ultraportable in the US? Okay, so it has taken the company a bit longer to prep the 13.3-inch laptop for its American debut, but it’s here and it looks like it was well worth the wait. While Sony is holding that it will not replace the VAIO Z Series, which has just recently gone out of stock on Sony’s website, there’s no denying that it fills a similar high-end ultraportable spot. Don’t be fooled by its inch-thick profile, it packs a serious amount of horsepower — like the UK version, it will be configurable with Sandy Bridge Core i5 and i7 processors, AMD Radeon HD 6630 graphics with 1GB of VRAM (sadly, there’s still a physical toggle for switching), Blu-ray, and a range of SSDs. As you can tell from the image above, the design drops the circular hinge of previous VAIOs, but the 3.9-pound machine is still made of magnesium and aluminum, has a backlit keyboard, while also sporting the option of a unique slice battery that meshes with the overall aesthetic.

However, that $150 extended cell isn’t just any old battery — it’s said to provide a total of 15 hours of battery life when latched onto the bottom of the system as it can actually charge the primary integrated battery. Additionally, it comes with its own AC adapter so it can be charged separately from the entire rig. Yep, this one is filled to the brim with the latest and greatest, and even better it doesn’t seem terribly overpriced — the $979 starting model packs a Core i5-2410 processor, those aforementioned AMD graphics, and a 320GB hard drive. It should be available for pre-order later today and we’re hoping to bring you a full review of it soon, but until then we have a few hands-on shots of the laptop back at CES below.

Continue reading Sony VAIO S arrives stateside, brings along an advanced extended battery

Sony VAIO S arrives stateside, brings along an advanced extended battery originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 07 Mar 2011 08:00:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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postheadericon Flexible batteries get the graphene treatment, could be cheaper than other bendy batts

We’ve been talking about flexible batteries for years now, but a team of Korean researchers have presented a new solution to bendable energy sources that is not only more powerful than standard lithium-ion batteries, but also potentially cheaper to produce than its malleable predecessors — and unsurprisingly, everyone’s favorite wonder material, graphene, is at the heart of the innovation. The rechargeable battery contains a vanadium-oxide cathode, grown on a sheet of graphene paper, an unidentified separator, and an anode made of lithium-coated graphene. According to the folks behind the new power source, it sports higher energy and power density, as well as a better cycle life than the literally stiff competition. Similar advances have also out-performed rigid lithium-ion batteries, but have enlisted carbon nanotubes, a material more expensive to produce than graphene. Of course, like all technological advances, we won’t be seeing these things for years, if not decades, so you might as well get used to ye olde standard bearer.

Flexible batteries get the graphene treatment, could be cheaper than other bendy batts originally appeared on Engadget on Wed, 02 Mar 2011 01:53:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink Graphene-Info  |  sourceEnergy and Environmental Science  | Email this | Comments