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Categories

Archive for the ‘Gaming’ Category

postheadericon Ion iCade hands-on: gaming on the iPad like it’s 1979 (video)

You may recall ThinkGeek’s pretty convincing April Fools’ prank last year: the iCade cabinet for the iPad. Now, thanks to the keen beans at Ion, the two companies held hands and turned this totally rad concept into reality (although they’re definitely not the first). Come late spring, retro gaming enthusiasts will be able to pick up one of these well-built Bluetooth joystick kits for $99 direct from Ion, and eventually they’ll make it across the pond for about €99 and £79. Don’t worry, there’ll be plenty of classic games available to suit the iCase courtesy of Atari, who’s already got Asteroids working beautifully on the iPad (and it’s actually a lot harder than it looks); any iOS game that takes a Bluetooth input peripheral should also play nice with the iCade. Hands-on video after the break.

Continue reading Ion iCade hands-on: gaming on the iPad like it’s 1979 (video)

Ion iCade hands-on: gaming on the iPad like it’s 1979 (video) originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 07 Jan 2011 10:08:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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postheadericon Ion iCade hands-on: gaming on the iPad like it’s 1979 (video)

You may recall ThinkGeek’s pretty convincing April Fools’ prank last year: the iCade cabinet for the iPad. Now, thanks to the keen beans at Ion, the two companies held hands and turned this totally rad concept into reality (although they’re definitely not the first). Come late spring, retro gaming enthusiasts will be able to pick up one of these well-built Bluetooth joystick kits for $99 direct from Ion, and eventually they’ll make it across the pond for about €99 and £79. Don’t worry, there’ll be plenty of classic games available to suit the iCase courtesy of Atari, who’s already got Asteroids working beautifully on the iPad (and it’s actually a lot harder than it looks); any iOS game that takes a Bluetooth input peripheral should also play nice with the iCade. Hands-on video after the break.

Continue reading Ion iCade hands-on: gaming on the iPad like it’s 1979 (video)

Ion iCade hands-on: gaming on the iPad like it’s 1979 (video) originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 07 Jan 2011 10:08:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |   | Email this | Comments

postheadericon Super Mario reimagined as a first-person game, conquers the castle of our hearts (video)

You’ve seen Super Mario evolve from a modest 2D sprite into a 3D world-exploring superhero mechanic, but have you ever seen life through his eyes? Here’s your opportunity, as a fanmade animation treats us to a first-person view of the intrepid Italian’s adventures through the familiar World 1-1. There are kill streaks, achievements like “headbanger” and “pole dancer,” and some extremely realistic sound effects to set the mood. The priceless video follows after the break.

Continue reading Super Mario reimagined as a first-person game, conquers the castle of our hearts (video)

Super Mario reimagined as a first-person game, conquers the castle of our hearts (video) originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 18 Mar 2011 12:47:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink VGChartz  |  sourcefreddiew (YouTube)  | Email this | Comments

postheadericon Geek Run, a Kinect game

This game, designed by Emilie Tappolet, Raphaƫl Munoz and Maria Beltran, involves manipulating physical cubes as if they were game controllers.

Geek Run is a collaborative game prototype played with cubes and a Kinect controller programed with open frameworks and presented at the LIFT11 conferences. By moving cubes on the floor in front of the Kinect, players control different functional elements in the virtual world. The lead character, a geek, follows a series of forking paths; the goal of the game is to help him get to a final destination without getting killed. By placing the cubes in the correct position, the geek avoids the obstacles and/or opens up a new path in the game. As in a choose-your-own-adventure book, your choices open up new possibilities for gameplay.

postheadericon Gaming Minis From Twist-Ties

Shown above is only the most recent work, using this technique, of Photobucket user ionustron, for whom it has been a lifelong hobby. Here’s another:

You can see the rest of his portfolio at his Photobucket account, and read the (surprisingly moving) memoir of his creations over at selectbutton. [via Boing Boing]