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Categories

Archive for the ‘Gift Guides’ Category

postheadericon Holiday gift guides on CRAFT

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As much as we try not to encourage a gender split between MAKE and CRAFT, our reports show its definitely there. So for the 90% of you dudes out there reading, CRAFT has some great gift ideas for the ladies and other crafty-creative types on your list:

Pictured above are Diana Eng’s awesome fortune cookie coin purses.

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postheadericon Holiday Gift Guide 2010: Maker letters to Cyber Santa

MZ_HolidayGiftGuide10_v1.gif

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Cyber Santa by Jim Leftwich, from 1993’s edition of Beyond Cyberpunk!

We asked our readers to tell us what was on their wish lists. They composed letters to Cyber Santa. Here’s a sampling.

Nick Brenn:

Dear Santa…

I want an Arduino Uno and a Drawdio Kit! I think I am on your good list.

Thanks,
Nick


rotexPunch.jpg

A Rotex punch

Upir:

Oh, Santa please, I’ve been… kinda good…

I would like a 3D printer, a laser cutter that can do sheet metal, and a Rotex punch.

Thank you,

Upir

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postheadericon Holiday Gift Guide 2010: Chemistry

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Scientists, and especially chemists, are notoriously hard to shop for. Equipment can be hard for others to pick well, and the alternative to something practical is usually something funny. Or something that tries to be funny. In point of fact, good science gag gifts are pretty hard to find, too. Check my recs, below, and you’ll be off to a better-than-average start.

Hoffman-clamps.jpg

Hoffman tubing clamps, open- and closed-sided ($1.20-$1.30 each from eNasco)

Hoffman clamps are extraordinarily handy bits of lab kit. The screw is turned to compress a piece of flexible tubing between two bars, and may thus be used to completely stop or simply to regulate flow of gas or liquid through such tubing. The screwing action of the Hoffman clamp allows adjustment of the rate of flow infinitesimally, from full open to full stop. In amateur apparatus, a Hoffman clamp can often take the place of a glass or Teflon stopcock, which is a much more sophisticated and expensive bit of apparatus. And they’re cheap!


molar beach ball.jpg

Molar beach ball ($7.50 from the American Chemical Society)

A “mole,” in case you don’t know, is the unit used by chemists to enumerate atoms or molecules. One mole is Avogadro’s number (6.02 x 10^23) of individual atoms or molecules. One of the remarkable things a person learns in general chemistry is the huge difference in molar volumes between liquid and gas phases. A mole of liquid water, for instance, takes up 18 mL, whereas the same number of water molecules in the gas phase takes up 22400 mL! Another interesting fact is that, because molecules interact so little with each other in the gas phase, all gases have effectively the same molar volume, which, again, is 22400 mL, or 22.4 L, at average atmospheric temperatures and pressures. The American Chemical Society has designed this cool beach ball to contain 22.4 L, or one mole, of gas. It’s a great teaching aid and a nifty idea in general.

Read the Full Story » | More on MAKE » | Comments » |

Read more articles in Gift Guides |

Digg this!

postheadericon Holiday Gift Guide 2010: Chemistry

MZ_HolidayGiftGuide10_v1.gif

Scientists, and especially chemists, are notoriously hard to shop for. Equipment can be hard for others to pick well, and the alternative to something practical is usually something funny. Or something that tries to be funny. In point of fact, good science gag gifts are pretty hard to find, too. Check my recs, below, and you’ll be off to a better-than-average start.

Hoffman-clamps.jpg

Hoffman tubing clamps, open- and closed-sided ($1.20-$1.30 each from eNasco)

Hoffman clamps are extraordinarily handy bits of lab kit. The screw is turned to compress a piece of flexible tubing between two bars, and may thus be used to completely stop or simply to regulate flow of gas or liquid through such tubing. The screwing action of the Hoffman clamp allows adjustment of the rate of flow infinitesimally, from full open to full stop. In amateur apparatus, a Hoffman clamp can often take the place of a glass or Teflon stopcock, which is a much more sophisticated and expensive bit of apparatus. And they’re cheap!


molar beach ball.jpg

Molar beach ball ($7.50 from the American Chemical Society)

A “mole,” in case you don’t know, is the unit used by chemists to enumerate atoms or molecules. One mole is Avogadro’s number (6.02 x 10^23) of individual atoms or molecules. One of the remarkable things a person learns in general chemistry is the huge difference in molar volumes between liquid and gas phases. A mole of liquid water, for instance, takes up 18 mL, whereas the same number of water molecules in the gas phase takes up 22400 mL! Another interesting fact is that, because molecules interact so little with each other in the gas phase, all gases have effectively the same molar volume, which, again, is 22400 mL, or 22.4 L, at average atmospheric temperatures and pressures. The American Chemical Society has designed this cool beach ball to contain 22.4 L, or one mole, of gas. It’s a great teaching aid and a nifty idea in general.

Read the Full Story » | More on MAKE » | Comments » |

Read more articles in Gift Guides |

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postheadericon Holiday Gift Guide 2010: Electronics Tools

MZ_HolidayGiftGuide10_v1.gif

Whether total beginner or seasoned pro, there’s one thing that all electronics enthusiasts need to do their work: the right tools! Here are some of my favorites for the circuit tinkerers on your gift list.

2010_gift_guide_EX330.jpg
Extech EX330 multimeter, Extech, $55
A multimeter is one of the basic tools that you’ll depend on, so it makes sense to put a little money into a good one. The Extech EX330 is the winner of Dave Jones’s extensive multimeter shootout, and it’s a great little meter. I picked one up when my formerly trusty benchtop meter died, and I haven’t looked back.


2010_gift_guide_multimeter_kit.jpg
Multimeter Kit, Maker Shed, $20
Rather than buying a commercial multimeter, another fun option is to build your own. Though not quite as fancy as the above Extech, this kit is capable of making basic voltage, current, and resistance measurements, plus you get the satisfaction of knowing you built it yourself!

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