Buy ASIC Bitcoin Miner
Gadgets For Geeks
Add This Feed
Subscribe in Bloglines

Subscribe in NewsGator Online
Add to My AOL
Add to netvibes
Add to The Free Dictionary

Add to Excite MIX
Add to netomat Hub
Add to fwicki
Add to Webwag
Add to Plusmo
Add to Google Reader or Homepage
Categories

Archive for the ‘hdd’ Category

postheadericon Western Digital’s new My Book Studio Edition II has 6TB on offer, but no Thunderbolt or USB 3.0

Western Digital's new My Book Studio Edition II has 6TB on offer, but no Thunderbolt or USB 3.0

If you want a lot of the GBs in not a lot of space, 3TB per disk is about as good as you’re going to get. Western Digital has slapped two of its triple-terabyte monsters into a dual-disk enclosure and paired it with eSATA and FireWire 800 interfaces to create the My Book Studio Edition II. There’s a good ‘ol USB 2.0 hole in there as well, but no USB 3.0 or Thunderbolt for those getting hip with the new connections. Time Machine support is baked in as well as your choice of RAID configurations, all at a cost of $549.99. That’s a good bit more than you’d spend if you bought a pair of disks and an empty enclosure, but such is the price of convenience.

Continue reading Western Digital’s new My Book Studio Edition II has 6TB on offer, but no Thunderbolt or USB 3.0

Western Digital’s new My Book Studio Edition II has 6TB on offer, but no Thunderbolt or USB 3.0 originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 17 Mar 2011 11:32:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |  sourceWestern Digital  | Email this | Comments

postheadericon Seagate Pulsar XT.2 and Pulsar.2 SSDs target enterprise, reliability-obsessed consumers

Seagate has just taken the wraps off a slew of fresh enterprise storage drives, highlighted by a pair of new Pulsar SSDs. The MLC NAND-equipped Pulsar.2 is capable of 6Gbps speeds over SATA, while the 2.5-inch XT.2 uses SLC memory and a 6Gbps SAS connection, and both are unsurprisingly touted as being the fastest and finest guardians you can buy for your company’s data. Seagate sees the use of MLC flash on the Pulsar.2 as a major advantage in lowering costs, while its data-protecting and error-correcting firmware is expected to maintain the high levels of data integrity required in this space. No price is actually given to validate Seagate’s claims of a breakthrough price / performance combination, but both of its new SSDs should be available in the second quarter of this year. The XT.2 is already shipping out to OEMs, along with its 360MBps read and 300MBps write speeds. There are also new Savvio and Constellation HDDs from the company, but you’ll have to read the 1,400-word essay press release after the break to learn more about them.

Continue reading Seagate Pulsar XT.2 and Pulsar.2 SSDs target enterprise, reliability-obsessed consumers

Seagate Pulsar XT.2 and Pulsar.2 SSDs target enterprise, reliability-obsessed consumers originally appeared on Engadget on Wed, 16 Mar 2011 06:39:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |   | Email this | Comments

postheadericon Ask Engadget: best home backup solution?

We know you’ve got questions, and if you’re brave enough to ask the world for answers, here’s the outlet to do so. This week’s Ask Engadget question is coming to us from Michel, who seems to be having difficulty sleeping without a decent backup solution in his home. If you’re looking to send in an inquiry of your own, drop us a line at ask [at] engadget [dawt] com.

“It’s been 6 years since the last Ask Engadget article on best home backup solution. Is there a good update yet? It’s for PC, and I need to be able to disconnect the hard drive and plug it in, and navigate the folders like on my main PC. Thanks!”

Home backup solutions have come a long way over the years, but having one that also funtions as a conventional external drive cuts down your options somewhat. We’re guessing this fellow is looking for something more akin to a Clickfree drive rather than a 5-bay NAS, so if you’ve got any recommendations in that area, shout ’em out in comments below.

Ask Engadget: best home backup solution? originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 10 Mar 2011 23:00:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |   | Email this | Comments

postheadericon Ask Engadget: best home backup solution?

We know you’ve got questions, and if you’re brave enough to ask the world for answers, here’s the outlet to do so. This week’s Ask Engadget question is coming to us from Michel, who seems to be having difficulty sleeping without a decent backup solution in his home. If you’re looking to send in an inquiry of your own, drop us a line at ask [at] engadget [dawt] com.

“It’s been 6 years since the last Ask Engadget article on best home backup solution. Is there a good update yet? It’s for PC, and I need to be able to disconnect the hard drive and plug it in, and navigate the folders like on my main PC. Thanks!”

Home backup solutions have come a long way over the years, but having one that also funtions as a conventional external drive cuts down your options somewhat. We’re guessing this fellow is looking for something more akin to a Clickfree drive rather than a 5-bay NAS, so if you’ve got any recommendations in that area, shout ’em out in comments below.

Ask Engadget: best home backup solution? originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 10 Mar 2011 23:00:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |   | Email this | Comments

postheadericon Samsung HDD manages 1TB per platter, areal-density enthusiasts rejoice

Solid state drives are the geek storage of choice, what with their quiet nature, blazing fast speed, and stunning good looks. However, the limited capacity and sky-high price of SSDs keeps many of us buying traditional disk-based storage solutions — which is just fine considering Samsung keeps finding ways to fit more bits and bytes on every drive. Last year, Sammy’s EcoGreen F4EG squeezed 2TB onto a 3-platter drive (or 667GB per platter), and now the company’s primed to release a new series of Spinpoint drives with even greater areal density at a time and price that remains TBD. Whenever they do get here, the new HDDs promise to deliver up to 1TB per platter spinning at 5,400RPM — meaning 4TB desktop drives and a terabyte of storage (courtesy of two 500GB platters) in standard-sized laptop HDDs. The 3.5-inch version packs a 32MB cache and SATA 6Gbps compatibility, while the 2.5-inch variety has an 8MB cache and a 3 Gb/s SATA interface. Knowing all that, only one question remains: could areal-density enthusiasts be the new pixel-density enthusiasts?

Samsung HDD manages 1TB per platter, areal-density enthusiasts rejoice originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 08 Mar 2011 02:32:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink Electronista  |  sourceHeise Online  | Email this | Comments