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Archive for the ‘Intel’ Category

postheadericon Mosaid gets into WiFi patent game, sues 17 companies including Dell, Canon, Asus, and RIM

MOSAID Files Wireless Patent Infringement Litigation OTTAWA, Ontario - March 17, 2011 - MOSAID Technologies Inc. (TSX:MSD) today announced that it has initiated wireless patent infringement litigation against the following companies: AsusTek Computer Inc.; Atheros Communications, Inc.; Canon U.S.A., Inc.; CSR plc; Dell, Inc.; Digi International Inc.; Huawei Technologies Co., Ltd.; Intel Corporation; Lexmark International, Inc.; Marvell Semiconductor, Inc.; Murata Manufacturing Co., Ltd.; Ralink Technology Corporation; Realtek Semiconductor; Research in Motion Corporation; Wasp Barcode Technologies, Ltd.; Wistron Corporation; and Venture Research, Inc. The suit was filed on March 16, 2011 in the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Texas, Marshall Division. MOSAID believes that the companies have infringed and continue to infringe MOSAID's patents by making and selling products that comply with or implement the IEEE 802.11 family of communications standards, known as Wi-Fi. The standards-essential patents in suit are MOSAID's U.S. Patent Nos. 5,131,006; 5,151,920; 5,422,887; 5,706,428; 6,563,786 B1; and 6,992,972. Whether or not you agree with their tactics, lots of companies are finding it quite lucrative business to spend more time in the courts than in the research labs. CSIRO got some tasty settlements back in 2009, while just a few months ago Wi-LAN received “a significant amount” in a settlement from Intel. Now it’s Mosaid’s turn, a Kanata, Ontario-based company that bills itself as “one of the world’s leading intellectual property (IP) companies, focused on the licensing and development of semiconductor and communications technologies.” Indeed it just licensed some of those properties to LG on the 15th, but the very next day it filed suit against a 17 defendants for infringing on six of the company’s patents, relating to network discovery, multiplexing, and other wireless techniques. Among those companies is RIM; which has its Torch, Style, Curve, Pearl, Bold, Storm handsets called out; and Asus, which has a long line of motherboards, routers, and other products said to be in jeopardy. As ever it’s hard to draw the line between the patent trolls and the legitimately infringed, but that the lawsuit was filed in litigation-friendly Marshall, Texas doesn’t leave us with a particularly good feeling.

Continue reading Mosaid gets into WiFi patent game, sues 17 companies including Dell, Canon, Asus, and RIM

Mosaid gets into WiFi patent game, sues 17 companies including Dell, Canon, Asus, and RIM originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 18 Mar 2011 13:19:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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postheadericon Intel Turbo Boost is MIA on new 13-inch MacBook Pro? (update: negatory)

If you were expecting your new 13-inch MacBook Pro’s Core i7 CPU to Turbo Boost its way north of that default 2.7GHz clock speed, we might suggest discontinuing your anticipation. Two separate reviews of the laptop are reporting the curious case of its Core i7-2620M processor failing to automatically overclock itself the way it should. Intel’s dual-core chip is capable of a maximum speed of 3.4GHz, but reviewers weren’t able to get it any higher than its stock setting while testing Apple’s latest 13-incher. High temperatures were identified (north of 90C / 194F) as the likely culprit, with Notebook Journal also finding its machine throttled down to 798MHz due to heat dissipation issues. PC Pro theorizes that Apple intentionally disabled the Turbo Boost functionality on this particular MBP model in order to preserve your lap and your pride from being scalded by melting components. That would make sense to us, and hey, it’s still a fast machine, just not Turbo fast.

[Thanks, Markus]

Update: AnandTech‘s findings contradict the above, with Anand asserting that “there’s absolutely no funny business going on here, the dual-core 2.7 is allowed to hit its maximum frequencies.” Seems like we’ll need to keep digging to get to the bottom of this one.

Update 2: We’ve confirmed with Apple that there are no specific hardware or software limits to block the Turbo Boost function, however we’ve also discovered, through less direct sources, that the company is providing new low level software tools to diagnose cooling issues with the 2011 batch of laptops. Ergo, the speed limits that PC Pro and Notebook Journal encountered might have been caused by inadequate heat dissipation, which arguably is no less troubling than an Apple-mandated de-Turbo-fication.

Intel Turbo Boost is MIA on new 13-inch MacBook Pro? (update: negatory) originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 11 Mar 2011 05:10:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |  sourcePC Pro, Notebook Journal  | Email this | Comments

postheadericon Intel Turbo Boost is MIA on new 13-inch MacBook Pro? (update: negatory)

If you were expecting your new 13-inch MacBook Pro’s Core i7 CPU to Turbo Boost its way north of that default 2.7GHz clock speed, we might suggest discontinuing your anticipation. Two separate reviews of the laptop are reporting the curious case of its Core i7-2620M processor failing to automatically overclock itself the way it should. Intel’s dual-core chip is capable of a maximum speed of 3.4GHz, but reviewers weren’t able to get it any higher than its stock setting while testing Apple’s latest 13-incher. High temperatures were identified (north of 90C / 194F) as the likely culprit, with Notebook Journal also finding its machine throttled down to 798MHz due to heat dissipation issues. PC Pro theorizes that Apple intentionally disabled the Turbo Boost functionality on this particular MBP model in order to preserve your lap and your pride from being scalded by melting components. That would make sense to us, and hey, it’s still a fast machine, just not Turbo fast.

[Thanks, Markus]

Update: AnandTech‘s findings contradict the above, with Anand asserting that “there’s absolutely no funny business going on here, the dual-core 2.7 is allowed to hit its maximum frequencies.” Seems like we’ll need to keep digging to get to the bottom of this one.

Update 2: We’ve confirmed with Apple that there are no specific hardware or software limits to block the Turbo Boost function, however we’ve also discovered, through less direct sources, that the company is providing new low level software tools to diagnose cooling issues with the 2011 batch of laptops. Ergo, the speed limits that PC Pro and Notebook Journal encountered might have been caused by inadequate heat dissipation, which arguably is no less troubling than an Apple-mandated de-Turbo-fication.

Intel Turbo Boost is MIA on new 13-inch MacBook Pro? (update: negatory) originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 11 Mar 2011 05:10:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |  sourcePC Pro, Notebook Journal  | Email this | Comments

postheadericon Canon ‘excited’ about Intel Thunderbolt I/O, makes no promise to support it

Would you like a Canon professional video camera that blasts footage to an editing rig at up to ten gigabits per second? How about a consumer-grade camcorder that transfers files to your home computer at the same blazing speed? Such things might be in the pipeline at Canon, but we can’t really say for sure. Today, the Japanese camera company came out in support of Intel’s Thunderbolt I/O, saying how “it will bring new levels of performance and simplicity to the video creation market,” but without so much as a formal press release — nor, in fact, a pledge to work towards any of the ultra-speedy optical gear of which we’ve been dreaming. Oh well, there’s always next week.

Canon ‘excited’ about Intel Thunderbolt I/O, makes no promise to support it originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 10 Mar 2011 20:22:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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postheadericon Canon ‘excited’ about Intel Thunderbolt I/O, makes no promise to support it

Would you like a Canon professional video camera that blasts footage to an editing rig at up to ten gigabits per second? How about a consumer-grade camcorder that transfers files to your home computer at the same blazing speed? Such things might be in the pipeline at Canon, but we can’t really say for sure. Today, the Japanese camera company came out in support of Intel’s Thunderbolt I/O, saying how “it will bring new levels of performance and simplicity to the video creation market,” but without so much as a formal press release — nor, in fact, a pledge to work towards any of the ultra-speedy optical gear of which we’ve been dreaming. Oh well, there’s always next week.

Canon ‘excited’ about Intel Thunderbolt I/O, makes no promise to support it originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 10 Mar 2011 20:22:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |  sourceIntel  | Email this | Comments