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Archive for the ‘laser’ Category

postheadericon University of Central Florida’s miniature laser diode aims to speed up networking

The use of laser as a means of data transmission is hardly anything new, but the current crop of laser diodes can only handle so much stress, provided that they don’t fail in the first place. Luckily, the geniuses over at the University of Central Florida are about to deliver a smaller yet more intense and more reliable diode, which will lead to many more potential applications even beyond the scope of networking — think cheaper, more effective hair removal. Little is said about how Professor Dennis Deppe’s team made this possible, but once they work out how to optimize the operating voltage for better efficiency, Deppe reckons we’ll see diode-embedded high speed, high bandwidth cables in the shops in four or five years’ time. Seriously, we’d do anything to keep our latency low for some HD gaming action.

Continue reading University of Central Florida’s miniature laser diode aims to speed up networking

University of Central Florida’s miniature laser diode aims to speed up networking originally appeared on Engadget on Wed, 16 Mar 2011 16:18:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |  sourcePhysOrg  | Email this | Comments

postheadericon In lasers we trust: NASA researches 5kW galactic trash disposal system

Space junk is a growing problem — 200,000 pieces and counting — and as the amount of earth’s orbital debris increases, so does the chance some satellite will be involved in a cosmic collision. As this would cause much gnashing of teeth and woe for the affected terrestrial parties, some researchers from NASA’s Ames Research Center have pitched the idea of removing said junk with a laser — once again proving that everything’s better with lasers. The idea is to use a 5kW ray, like the one we’ve got at the Starfire Optical Range, to slow our galactic garbage enough to burn it up in earth’s atmosphere. Current estimates say such a laser could eliminate ten pieces of junk a day, promising us a future of neat and tidy skies.

In lasers we trust: NASA researches 5kW galactic trash disposal system originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 15 Mar 2011 01:21:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink Technology Review  |  sourceCornell University Library  | Email this | Comments

postheadericon Purdue researchers make solar cell manufacturing cheaper, more efficient with lasers

Is there anything lasers can’t do? We only ask because they seem to be improving everything from microphones to railroads, and now researchers from Purdue University have leveraged the power of light to better manufacture solar cells. Using an ultrashort (as in quadrillionths of a second) pulse laser to more precisely scribe the microchannels connecting thin-film solar cells — as compared to current mechanical stylus methods — the Boilermakers were able to improve energy transfer efficiency between cells and significantly reduce manufacturing time. Having demonstrated the process works, research continues to better understand and prepare it for use by manufacturers — sooner rather than later, we hope.

Purdue researchers make solar cell manufacturing cheaper, more efficient with lasers originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 11 Mar 2011 07:17:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink Daily Tech  |  sourcePurdue University  | Email this | Comments

postheadericon Purdue researchers make solar cell manufacturing cheaper, more efficient with lasers

Is there anything lasers can’t do? We only ask because they seem to be improving everything from microphones to railroads, and now researchers from Purdue University have leveraged the power of light to better manufacture solar cells. Using an ultrashort (as in quadrillionths of a second) pulse laser to more precisely scribe the microchannels connecting thin-film solar cells — as compared to current mechanical stylus methods — the Boilermakers were able to improve energy transfer efficiency between cells and significantly reduce manufacturing time. Having demonstrated the process works, research continues to better understand and prepare it for use by manufacturers — sooner rather than later, we hope.

Purdue researchers make solar cell manufacturing cheaper, more efficient with lasers originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 11 Mar 2011 07:17:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink Daily Tech  |  sourcePurdue University  | Email this | Comments

postheadericon Laser Cut Celly Holders


In one of my classes, we’re making cell phone pouches recently. On Monday, we looked at some fabric iPod cases on Flickr, and then they made sketch models with paper and tape. Sketch models are a very quick model that allows you to see what the design will be before committing lots of time, expense, and materials to the design. The sketch model allows you to hold the idea in your hand in the fastest turnaround possible. They had about 20 minutes to make theirs, which placed an emphases on speed over perfection, which could come later.

Students next transferred the measurements to the computer and cut the shapes with the laser. On Thursday, some started cutting t-shirt fabric on the laser. A couple of students are sewing with hand but fabric glue is faster. As a finished product, glue probably isn’t the best, but it allows quick feedback on the design’s measurements. One student wanted to photo on to his design, so we managed to raster an image onto the fabric. This weekend, I scored a free sewing machine and associated gear, which should open up some new possibilities.

A few weeks ago, I came across a half dozen or so fabric sample swatch books that look like they came from an upholstery shop. These can be used for smaller cuts. In looking for more formal material, I picked up a thrift store leather jacket that can be parted and used for leather cases. Since the leather will be more scarce, it will be used only on more finished designs.

After working with denser, thicker materials on the laser for years, I am thrilled at the speed of iteration with thin, light materials. Getting students through the cycle of designing, fabricating, and testing so quickly allows for the revisions needed to make a polished final product.

You can see the photos and the project description here.