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Archive for the ‘Maker Faire’ Category

postheadericon Maker Faire Detroit Town Hall, Tuesday, March 22, 6:30pm-8:00pm (ET)

You are invited to:

Maker Faire Detroit Town Hall
Tuesday, March 22, 2011, 6:30 PM – 8:00 PM (ET)

Detroit Public Library
5201 Woodward Avenue,
Detroit, MI 48202

Event Details: Dale, Sherry, Louise and Shauna will be hosting a Maker Faire Detroit Town Hall and Community Planning Meeting on Tuesday, March 22nd at The Detroit Public Library (Main Branch) in the the Old Fine Arts room and would like to invite you to attend. …Read more on EventBrite

Share this event on Facebook and Twitter.
We hope you can make it!

See the EventBrite listing for full details.

Cheers,
The Maker Faire Team

postheadericon Maker Faire Bay Area — 2011: A Maker Space Odyssey


We’re thrilled by how things are shaping up for this year’s Maker Faire Bay Area. This year’s theme will be:

2011: A Maker Space Odyssey — From Maker Space to Outer Space

Some highlights for 2011, so far, include:

Returning Favorites:
– MakerBot 3D printing area
– MakerShed Learn to Solder Area
– Arc Attack – Musical Tesla Coils
– Flaming Lotus Girls with Three Mutopia Pods
– Lil Ju Ju Pinball Museum
– FIRST Tech Challenge & FIRST Lego League
– R2 D2 Astromech Droids
– Land Sharks – RC controlled neon creatures
– Twin Towers 19′ Tesla Coils
– Young Maker Projects
– Make and Launch Compressed Air Rockets
– Interactive Sculpture Garden by Posables
– Makerspace and Hackerspace

Flaming Lotus Girls, Maker Fair Bay Area, 2010. Image by twelves.

New Makers and Activities:
– Chariot Races (organized by Madagascar Institute)
– DIY Kit makers, including:
       NASA/Make: Space challenge
       Open hardware electronic kits
       DIY Kits for kids, by kids
       Algae kits to grow your our spirulina superfood
       Cheese-making kits
– “Race and Shoot” games from SF Model Yacht club
– Stanford Solar Car Project
– Bug in a book workshop – From MAKE Volume 16, the Spy Tech issue
– Fresh-pressed Sunflower Oil

Want to learn more about Maker Faire? Meet the Maker Faire team and fellow makers? Learn about our volunteer program? Tour the new TechShop San Francisco? We are holding a Maker Faire Town Hall on Tuesday, 3/15 at 7pm at the new TechShop San Francisco location. This is a perfect chance to get your questions answered and prepare for Maker Faire Bay Area 2011. To register to attend, and get more information, check out our EventBrite announcement.

Applications are available at: Call For Makers (Extended to March 21st!)

We can’t wait for this always-inspiring event and we hope we’ll see you there!

postheadericon Make: Live 2/9/11 – Soldering (video)



The second episode of Make: Live is online for your viewing pleasure! Matt and I had a great time hosting guests Limor Fried and Marc deVinck!

Subscribe to the MAKE Podcast in iTunes, download Make: Live episode 02 in its entirety (m4v), or watch clips on YouTube.

Limor “Ladyada” Fried – Soldering demo with the Game of Life Kit
Solder sorceress and Adafruit Industries founder Limor Fried joins us in-studio for a soldering demo featuring the Game of Life kit.

Marc deVinck – Electronic Merit Badge
Maker Shed product developer Marc deVinck developed the popular learn-to-solder badge you may have seen at Maker Faire, where you can learn to solder for $1 in the Maker Shed, then show off your new skill.

Show notes:

postheadericon Show Me a Maker Faire

I’ll be in Kansas City, MO tomorrow to meet with folks about organizing a Maker Faire there this summer. (Make:KC organized a Mini Maker Faire last summer.)

Sandy Clark, a Missourian (“The Show Me State”), sent me a note recalling his 2006 visit to the first Maker Faire in San Mateo, CA.

I live in Springfield, Missouri and volunteer at the Discovery Center. Laurie Duncan is coming up there tomorrow to find out about Maker Faire. I have sent her a long letter outlining local resources and interested groups in our area, about three hours south. I’m hopping we can bus a load in and send some great hacks your way.

I wanted to share my impression of the first Maker Faire with you. I lived in Oakland at the time. It was life changing.

Oh the store of inquiry and wonder. When you love to hack and think of people as these vessels of unlimited potential, it is hard to find your place. In a button-down culture of rigid guidelines and expectations, enthusiasm and hacking are a threat. Don’t be too passionate. Don’t be too enthusiastic. Those become things you pursue alone.

Football fans will fill a stadium in an orgy of overexuberence, but hacking is done in isolation. It was a lonely proposition up until MAKE magazine launched the first Maker Faire in 2006.

Giant buoyant clouds of hydrogen bubbles rose up in a weightless column behind the entrance to the San Mateo Fairgrounds. Off to my right, a shiny red fire engine shot jets of flame into the sky.

That was my first impression of the very first Maker Faire.

Through the gate, I was confronted with hall after hall of nifty hacks and clever invention. A game of polo was being played with Segways on the green. Before I could decide what to do, a young man wearing an LCD screen on his chest shoved an Atari 2600 controller in my hand.

“Here,” someone said. “Try my new videogame.”

While I sorted that game out, he explained his quest to program the venerable 2600, the epic quest to learn to burn ROMS and 2600 programming quirks. I handed him the controller and he gave me a flyer with his website on it. Nobody has made 2600s or software for them in 20 years… Until now.

“Here,” he said to the couple behind me, “Wanna try my videogame?”

The polo players were coming off the field and I realized one of them was Apple founder Steve Wozniak. I walked over and introduced myself. We chatted. I got a photo. Nobody came up or made a scene.

woz.jpg

“You know,” I said. “We are probably at the center of the largest gathering of geeks I’ve ever seen, and nobody is even making a fuss over you.”

He grinned.

“I know, there is just too much cool stuff here.”

Above us the hydrogen filled bubbles ripped an orange seam of ignition across the sky. Two thousand people cheered.

I had been at the first Maker Fair less than 30 minutes. I was home.

Sandy Clark is a writer and a self-described “worm coddler” and geek.

Read the Full Story » | More on MAKE » | Comments » |

Read more articles in Maker Faire |

Digg this!

postheadericon Show Me a Maker Faire

I’ll be in Kansas City, MO tomorrow to meet with folks about organizing a Maker Faire there this summer. (Make:KC organized a Mini Maker Faire last summer.)

Sandy Clark, a Missourian (“The Show Me State”), sent me a note recalling his 2006 visit to the first Maker Faire in San Mateo, CA.

I live in Springfield, Missouri and volunteer at the Discovery Center. Laurie Duncan is coming up there tomorrow to find out about Maker Faire. I have sent her a long letter outlining local resources and interested groups in our area, about three hours south. I’m hopping we can bus a load in and send some great hacks your way.

I wanted to share my impression of the first Maker Faire with you. I lived in Oakland at the time. It was life changing.

Oh the store of inquiry and wonder. When you love to hack and think of people as these vessels of unlimited potential, it is hard to find your place. In a button-down culture of rigid guidelines and expectations, enthusiasm and hacking are a threat. Don’t be too passionate. Don’t be too enthusiastic. Those become things you pursue alone.

Football fans will fill a stadium in an orgy of overexuberence, but hacking is done in isolation. It was a lonely proposition up until Make Magazine launched the first Maker Faire in 2006.

Giant buoyant clouds of hydrogen bubbles rose up in a weightless column behind the entrance to the San Mateo Fairgrounds. Off to my right, a shiny red fire engine shot jets of flame into the sky.

That was my first impression of the very first Maker Faire.

Through the gate, I was confronted with hall after hall of nifty hacks and clever invention. A game of polo was being played with Segways on the green. Before I could decide what to do, a young man wearing an LCD screen on his chest shoved an Atari 2600 controller in my hand.

“Here,” someone said. “Try my new videogame.”

While I sorted that game out, he explained his quest to program the venerable 2600, the epic quest to learn to burn ROMS and 2600 programming quirks. I handed him the controller and he gave me a flyer with his website on it. Nobody has made 2600s or software for them in 20 years… Until now.

“Here,” he said to the couple behind me, “Wanna try my videogame?”

The polo players were coming off the field and I realized one of them was Apple founder Steve Wozniak. I walked over and introduced myself. We chatted. I got a photo. Nobody came up or made a scene.

woz.jpg

“You know,” I said. “We are probably at the center of the largest gathering of geeks I’ve ever seen, and nobody is even making a fuss over you.”

He grinned.

“I know, there is just too much cool stuff here.”

Above us the hydrogen filled bubbles ripped an orange seam of ignition across the sky. Two thousand people cheered.

I had been at the first Maker Fair less than 30 minutes. I was home.

Sandy Clark is a writer and a self-described “worm coddler” and geek.

Read the Full Story » | More on MAKE » | Comments » |

Read more articles in Maker Faire |

Digg this!