Buy ASIC Bitcoin Miner
Gadgets For Geeks
Add This Feed
Subscribe in Bloglines

Subscribe in NewsGator Online
Add to My AOL
Add to netvibes
Add to The Free Dictionary

Add to Excite MIX
Add to netomat Hub
Add to fwicki
Add to Webwag
Add to Plusmo
Add to Google Reader or Homepage
Categories

Archive for the ‘radio’ Category

postheadericon Networked ‘On Air’ light illuminates when webcast begins, dims when it ends (video)

We won’t get into the myriad ways to impress one’s audience while engaging in a live video podcast, but here’s one that slides into the ‘surefire’ category. The crafty folks over at MAKE decided to construct an automated On Air light for their new live sessions, and rather than automating it with a human hand flipping a switch at a predetermined time, they decided to wire it up to receive signals from a UStream API. In essence, the light is programmed to turn on when the podcast shows ‘online,’ and turn off when that status changes to ‘offline.’ It’s a beautifully simple concept, and yet, so illuminating. See for yourself after the break.

Continue reading Networked ‘On Air’ light illuminates when webcast begins, dims when it ends (video)

Networked ‘On Air’ light illuminates when webcast begins, dims when it ends (video) originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 08 Mar 2011 13:48:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |  sourceMAKE, XBee  | Email this | Comments

postheadericon JBL’s On Air Wireless AirPlay speaker dock gets official, unavailable to purchase

When we first peeked this AirPlay-enabled speaker dock, we were admittedly excited to see how things would turn out after it made rounds through the FCC. JBL just tossed up the splash page for the On Air Wireless speaker and we’ve gotta say — it looks to be a promising means of streaming your jams. The system connects wirelessly to your AirPlay-enabled Mac and iOS device on 4.2 or later and packs a screen that’ll display the track info of the song you’re rocking out to. What’s more, the rounded grill sports a dual alarm clock, FM radio, and a USB port for future firmware updates. As you might have surmised by now, the dock is not yet available for purchase and there’s no word on price. If you’re interested, though, be sure to hit the source link, sign up for more info and get ready to headbang this spring.

JBL’s On Air Wireless AirPlay speaker dock gets official, unavailable to purchase originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 08 Mar 2011 07:03:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |  sourceJBL  | Email this | Comments

postheadericon Sirius XM to debut Tiger Blood Radio: all Charlie Sheen, all day long

Charlie Sheen has a pretty impressive track record: in addition to a twenty-five-plus year movie career, he’s brought tacky bowling shirts to the forefront of American consciousness, earned a Golden Globe Icon award, and shot his onetime fiance Kelly Preston. Is this enough to warrant an entire radio channel dedicated to the man who describes himself as having a “10,000-year-old brain and the boogers of a 7-year-old”? Apparently Sirius XM certainly thinks so. That’s right: the company has announced that Tiger Blood Radio will air for twenty-four hours beginning tomorrow at 6:00 am ET on Sirius channel 108 and XM channel 139. “[C]reated in response to the national conversation sparked by the recent events surrounding actor Charlie Sheen,” the company said in a statement, the station “will take listeners behind the headlines, exploring the media frenzy/media reaction, as well as the medical, psychological, psychiatric and pop culture and celebrity angles.” This definitely sounds like award winning journalism, and not a cynical way to make a few bucks off someone who’s clearly spinning out of control — Adonis DNA or not. PR after the break.

Continue reading Sirius XM to debut Tiger Blood Radio: all Charlie Sheen, all day long

Sirius XM to debut Tiger Blood Radio: all Charlie Sheen, all day long originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 04 Mar 2011 17:37:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink CrunchGear  |   | Email this | Comments

postheadericon ‘Stanford gurus enable two-way radio communications. Over.’

Call it the holy grail of radio transmissions if you must, but even if you’re not about to toss that label on it, there’s no question that the work being done in Stanford‘s engineering labs could destroy quite a few preconceived notions about wireless interference. Demoed as a concept last year, a newfangled wireless technology developed in Palo Alto is proving that signals can indeed be sent and received at the same time. Outside of the cellular telephony world, this seemingly simple occurrence doesn’t really happen — typical wireless signals have to take turns when it comes to listening and transmitting. As an example, it’s impossible for a WiFi router to “shout” out signals while also being intelligent enough to quiet its own voice in order to hear “whispers” from a connected device. The breakthrough came when researchers found that radios could be tweaked to filter out the signal from its own transmitter, something that already happens within noise-canceling headphones. If this can be packaged into a commercially viable platform, it could instantly double the amount of information sent over existing networks, and on an even grander scale, it could allow airplanes to radio into control towers simultaneously (a feat that’s shockingly impossible with today’s physics bearing down). Head on past the break for a downright enlightening video on the matter.

Continue reading ‘Stanford gurus enable two-way radio communications. Over.’

‘Stanford gurus enable two-way radio communications. Over.’ originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 18 Feb 2011 06:26:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink Slashdot  |  sourceStanford  | Email this | Comments

postheadericon Item-level RFIDs get support from big retailers, track your every purchase

Toilets, cows, and Germans have all been tagged by RFIDs, but according to a new study, it’s footwear and fashion that top the demand for radio-enabled tracking. In a report released yesterday, ABI Research said more than three-quarters of a billion RFID tags will be used in global apparel markets in 2011, with retailers like Walmart, Macy’s, and JC Penney leading the way. Item-level tracking isn’t new — in fact we saw something similar in 2006 — but with the likes of Walmart on board, the system is expected to grow as much as 60 percent in the next three years. The study suggests inventory and security as driving factors in the adoption of RFIDs, but we’ve got our suspicions. And anyway, we don’t want anyone to know how much we spent on that Material Girl leopard print shrug — not even a machine.

Item-level RFIDs get support from big retailers, track your every purchase originally appeared on Engadget on Wed, 09 Feb 2011 09:13:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink SlashGear  |  sourceABI Research  | Email this | Comments