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Categories

Archive for the ‘sata’ Category

postheadericon Intel Sandy Bridge chipset flaw identified as a rogue transistor affecting SATA ports

Intel raised quite a few eyebrows yesterday by disclosing that its Cougar Point chipsets suffer from an incurable design issue that would potentially degrade Serial ATA transfers over time. AnandTech has gone to the trouble of getting in touch with Intel to seek more information and the problem, as it turns out, is a single transistor that’s prone to a higher current leakage than tolerable. This can not only diminish performance over the 3Gbps SATA ports, it can actually make them fail altogether. There is more comforting news, however, in that the pair of 6Gbps SATA ports on the chipset are untroubled by this ailment, so devices and users that never plug into the 3Gbps connections can just carry on as if nothing’s ever happened. For everyone else, a repair and replacement service is taking place now, with Intel’s budget for dealing with this problem said to be a generous $700 million.

Intel Sandy Bridge chipset flaw identified as a rogue transistor affecting SATA ports originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 01 Feb 2011 04:56:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |  sourceAnandTech  | Email this | Comments

postheadericon Intel finds Sandy Bridge chipset design flaw, shipments stopped and recalls beginning

Intel finds Sandy Bridge chipset design flaw, shipments stopped and recalls beginning

A problem requiring a “silicon fix” is bad news in the chipset business, and sadly that’s what Intel is announcing. Its new Intel 6 Series chipset, Cougar Point, has been found to have a flaw, something to do with the SATA controller. Intel is indicating that the ports can “degrade over time,” leading to poor i/o performance down the road. All shipments have been stopped and a fix has been implemented for new deliveries, but it sounds like recalls will be starting soon for those with this ticking time bomb silicon within. It isn’t a critical problem right now, though, so if you own a Sandy Bridge Core i5 or Core i7 system keep computing with confidence while looking for a recall notice, but it is bad news for Intel’s bottom line: the company is advising a $300 million hit to revenue.

Update: Jimmy sent us a chat log with an Intel customer service representative indicating that this recall only affects “some desktop boards based on Intel P67 chipset,” that the H67 chipset boards appear to not be affected, but that the company doesn’t have a comprehensive list yet. We’ve certainly seen cases where CSRs don’t have all the info in this sort of situation, but still we’d advise waiting a bit before tearing your new mobo out and bringing it back to the store.

[Thanks, Matt]

Continue reading Intel finds Sandy Bridge chipset design flaw, shipments stopped and recalls beginning

Intel finds Sandy Bridge chipset design flaw, shipments stopped and recalls beginning originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 31 Jan 2011 10:53:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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postheadericon Toshiba introduces industry’s first 1.8-inch hard drives with LIF SATA connectors

Don’t ever knock Toshiba for not pumping up the little guy. Well, unless you’re producing microSATA-based 1.8-inch HDDs. Tosh has just revealed its newest line of PMP-friendly hard drives, with the industry’s first 1.8-inch units being issued with low-insertion force (LIF) SATA connectors. They’re being designed for use in media players, tablets and most anything else that can fit within the palm of your ever-sweating hand, with 160GB, 200GB and 220GB models being available. We’re told that they surpass 2.5-inch drives in terms of vibration robustness, low power consumption, and quiet operation, and the whole lot also includes a 16MB buffer and requires just 0.35-watts to operate at low power idle. The whole package measures just 5- x 54- x 71mm, and while pricing information isn’t readily available, samples will be headed out to product manufacturers next month.

Continue reading Toshiba introduces industry’s first 1.8-inch hard drives with LIF SATA connectors

Toshiba introduces industry’s first 1.8-inch hard drives with LIF SATA connectors originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 24 Jan 2011 22:04:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |  sourceBusiness Wire  | Email this | Comments

postheadericon Toshiba introduces industry’s first 1.8-inch hard drives with LIF SATA connectors

Don’t ever knock Toshiba for not pumping up the little guy. Well, unless you’re producing microSATA-based 1.8-inch HDDs. Tosh has just revealed its newest line of PMP-friendly hard drives, with the industry’s first 1.8-inch units being issued with low-insertion force (LIF) SATA connectors. They’re being designed for use in media players, tablets and most anything else that can fit within the palm of your ever-sweating hand, with 160GB, 200GB and 220GB models being available. We’re told that they surpass 2.5-inch drives in terms of vibration robustness, low power consumption, and quiet operation, and the whole lot also includes a 16MB buffer and requires just 0.35-watts to operate at low power idle. The whole package measures just 5- x 54- x 71mm, and while pricing information isn’t readily available, samples will be headed out to product manufacturers next month.

Continue reading Toshiba introduces industry’s first 1.8-inch hard drives with LIF SATA connectors

Toshiba introduces industry’s first 1.8-inch hard drives with LIF SATA connectors originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 24 Jan 2011 22:04:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |  sourceBusiness Wire  | Email this | Comments

postheadericon Thermaltake’s Max 5G dual-fan USB 3.0 HDD enclosure cools your platters with style

We know what you were thinking: my external hard drive enclosure is nice and all, but why is it so quiet? Well, Thermaltake is here to fix that with its new Max 5G dual-fan enclosure. Outside the fans and the fancy LED lights (which can be switched off, if you’re feeling unextreme one particular morning), the enclosure is pretty great itself, with a smokin’ USB 3.0 plug and support for high-end 3.5-inch SATA 3.0 drives. The fans are to promote long life on your hard drive and “data integrity” and all that, but pretty much they just say to your SATA drive: “I care.” And isn’t that all that matters? The enclosure is available for pre-order right now for $52, no word on release.

Thermaltake’s Max 5G dual-fan USB 3.0 HDD enclosure cools your platters with style originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 28 Dec 2010 21:25:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink Fareastgizmos  |  sourceThermaltake  | Email this | Comments