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Archive for the ‘screen’ Category

postheadericon Toshiba and Hitachi LCD plants damaged, will shut down for a month

You can’t have a 9.0 magnitude earthquake without breaking a few factories, particularly ones that produce fragile liquid crystal screens, and this week Toshiba, Hitachi and Panasonic are each reporting damages that have forced them to close LCD production facilities affected by the tsunami and quake. Panasonic isn’t sure when its plant in Chiba prefecture might resume carving up the glass sandwiches, telling Bloomberg that “there has been some damage, though not a fire or a collapse,” but both Hitachi and Toshiba will reportedly halt some assembly lines for around a month to deal with damages. It’s probably still too soon to talk about panel shortages — though they seem likely soon — but we’ll let you know how things progress.

Toshiba and Hitachi LCD plants damaged, will shut down for a month originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 17 Mar 2011 16:39:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |  sourceNikkei, Reuters, Bloomberg  | Email this | Comments

postheadericon LCD technology torn down and explained in the most lucid and accessible terms yet (video)

Look, we know you know all about LED backlights, light diffusion, subpixels, and the things that turn them on, but not everybody does. The humble LCD you’re most likely reading this on still retains a level of mystery about the nitty gritty details of how it works for the vast majority of its users, so here’s a terrific video breakdown of both its component parts and method of operation. Bill Hammack, a self-appointed Engineer Guy, takes us from the LED arrays that provide the light for most current LCDs, through all the filters and diffusers designed to make that light uniform, and into the ways thin film transistors make it possible for us to show moving color images of cats diving into boxes on such displays. It’s exciting, deeply nerdy stuff, and it awaits your audience after the break.

Continue reading LCD technology torn down and explained in the most lucid and accessible terms yet (video)

LCD technology torn down and explained in the most lucid and accessible terms yet (video) originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 17 Mar 2011 10:12:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |  sourceengineerguyvideo (YouTube)  | Email this | Comments

postheadericon Samsung prices 950 Series 3DTVs in Korea, rest of the world soon to follow

We’ve been keenly tracking the progress of these 3D displays from Samsung, from their pre-CES tease — where we were first told they were TVs, then monitors, then it turned out they were monitors with optional TV tuners — through their official launch and now to their first pricing and availability. South Korea is the unsurprising debut market for the 950 and 750 Series, both 27-inchers, discernible by their design, which in the 950’s case is asymmetric and in the 750’s is all about the thin bezel. A 1,000:1 contrast ratio, 2ms response time, 1080p resolution, and a litany of input ports await the buyer of either one, but he’d better bring a well-fed wallet to this party — the 27TA950 reportedly costs 890,000 KRW (nearly $800) whereas the 27TA750 is an 840,000 KRW outlay (just over $750). Not exactly value models, but those prices will likely change when the pair go international at some point later this month.

Continue reading Samsung prices 950 Series 3DTVs in Korea, rest of the world soon to follow

Samsung prices 950 Series 3DTVs in Korea, rest of the world soon to follow originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 07 Mar 2011 09:21:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |  sourceSamsung Tomorrow  | Email this | Comments

postheadericon 3M’s 32-inch display with 10-finger multitouch steps out at CeBIT (video)

Though there are bigger multitouch screens out there — and ones that can support more simultaneous touch points — 3M’s brand new C3266PW is the company’s largest, said to be suited for industrial-strength installations with multiple simultaneous users (the company is quick to note that the ultra-wide 178-degree viewing angle along both axes is great for that, since folks can crowd around and start touching). They demoed the new unit here at CeBIT in two ways: three of them in a row on a “cascade table” with one high, one slanted, and one low, and another separate unit mounted on a solo kiosk at roughly eye level. The table’s set up as a multi-display Windows box running a tech demo with maps, images, and videos that can be flicked between screens, pinched, and zoomed; the kiosk, meanwhile, is running a rudimentary flight simulator designed to demonstrate all ten points of multitouch capability at once with a finger-based aircraft control scheme (not the way you’d really design a game, but a good demo nonetheless).

3M points out that touch response — the amount of time that it takes the screen to actually recognize that it’s been touched — is an issue in the industry, and it’s not something that we really think about as users; if a gesture is laggy, we just assume the processor isn’t up to the task or the software sucks. The C3266PW is rated at a relatively brisk 12ms recognition time, and while the company has other products with even quicker ratings, we definitely noticed the lack of lag as we played around (of course, the computers powering the displays have plenty to do with that). We’ve come to associate good capacitive displays with glossy glass and resistive with matte, but that’s really not a fair assessment — this one has a non-glare “anti-stiction coating” that, as its name implies, makes your fingers glide like butter. It might not be great for a phone, but it works well for a display of this size that’s probably going to be used in public installations and potentially handled by hundreds of people a day. Follow the break for 3M’s press release and video of both setups!

Continue reading 3M’s 32-inch display with 10-finger multitouch steps out at CeBIT (video)

3M’s 32-inch display with 10-finger multitouch steps out at CeBIT (video) originally appeared on Engadget on Wed, 02 Mar 2011 17:54:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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postheadericon Eizo’s 27-inch ColorEdge CG275W has a 2560 x 1440 IPS panel, which will calibrate itself

Calibrating your monitor in order to maximize color accuracy is considered an inevitable chore for graphics professionals, but here comes Eizo with a defiant look on its face and a brand new 27-inch IPS display. The ColorEdge CG275W promises to do all the adjustments itself, eschewing the need for a separate calibration utility, and can even be set to do it overnight, freeing your creative mind to collect its much needed ration of Zs. Brightness maxes out at 270 nits, contrast is rated at 850:1, and there’s a 6ms gray-to-gray response time, not bad for the traditionally slower IPS tech. DVI, DisplayPort and Mini DisplayPort connectivity is augmented with a USB 2.0 hub, while the stand can tilt, rotate and swivel in typical Eizo fashion. You also get that fetching hood that’s compatible with both portrait and landscape orientation. Shipping begins at the end of this month, with pricing varying by territory.

Continue reading Eizo’s 27-inch ColorEdge CG275W has a 2560 x 1440 IPS panel, which will calibrate itself

Eizo’s 27-inch ColorEdge CG275W has a 2560 x 1440 IPS panel, which will calibrate itself originally appeared on Engadget on Wed, 02 Mar 2011 06:17:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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