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Categories

Archive for the ‘Wearables’ Category

postheadericon PCB / Component Rings

Yuma Fujimaki is certainly not the first person to make jewelry from scrap electronics components, but IMHO she has done a better job of it than most. [via adafruit]

More:
Nut And Bolt Wedding Rings And Uber Ring Round Up

postheadericon LilyPad Arduino with Fabric Snaps

Clever idea from Instructables user mizliz, who outfitted her LilyPad Arduino with a set of snap-on contacts so it can be quickly transferred from one soft-circuit prototype to another.

More:

postheadericon A CD, A Nickel, A Paper Clip, and Some Hot Glue

Plus a little treasure from nature. From Mrballeng, Instructables user and craftsman. I have rarely, if ever, seen anyone use pick-up materials so creatively or so skillfully. Hats off to you.

postheadericon BeeSim Game Using LilyPad and XBee

Bee Game
To teach children about complexity theory, a group from Indiana University created an electronic game called BeeSim using LilyPad Arduinos and XBee radios:

During the game children wear a Bee puppet wrist band with embedded electronics to allow for game play. The children have a finite amount of time (45 seconds) to collect and deposit nectar and a finite storage capacity of nectar (3 units). During the allotted time, a child runs from flower to flower and tries to collect nectar. A child can collect one unit of nectar from any given flower (if the flower is not empty) and will also be informed as to how much nectar remains inside the flower (via LED Array 1). A child may collect nectar from the same flower more than once. Once the child’s nectar stomach (represented via a LED array 2) has been filled, he or she returns to the hive and deposits the stored nectar. If time runs out prior to depositing nectar, the nectar is lost and is not counted. When a child’s turn is over, marked either by running out of time or by making a successful deposit, the bee puppet is passed to a teammate.

One of the team members, Ben Zaitlen, demonstrates the game and explains the technology:

[via Rob Faludi]

postheadericon BeeSim Game Using LilyPad and XBee

Bee Game
To teach children about complexity theory, a group from Indiana University created an electronic game called BeeSim using LilyPad Arduinos and XBee radios:

During the game children wear a Bee puppet wrist band with embedded electronics to allow for game play. The children have a finite amount of time (45 seconds) to collect and deposit nectar and a finite storage capacity of nectar (3 units). During the allotted time, a child runs from flower to flower and tries to collect nectar. A child can collect one unit of nectar from any given flower (if the flower is not empty) and will also be informed as to how much nectar remains inside the flower (via LED Array 1). A child may collect nectar from the same flower more than once. Once the child’s nectar stomach (represented via a LED array 2) has been filled, he or she returns to the hive and deposits the stored nectar. If time runs out prior to depositing nectar, the nectar is lost and is not counted. When a child’s turn is over, marked either by running out of time or by making a successful deposit, the bee puppet is passed to a teammate.

One of the team members, Ben Zaitlen, demonstrates the game and explains the technology:

[via Rob Faludi]