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Posts Tagged ‘display’

postheadericon Toshiba and Hitachi LCD plants damaged, will shut down for a month

You can’t have a 9.0 magnitude earthquake without breaking a few factories, particularly ones that produce fragile liquid crystal screens, and this week Toshiba, Hitachi and Panasonic are each reporting damages that have forced them to close LCD production facilities affected by the tsunami and quake. Panasonic isn’t sure when its plant in Chiba prefecture might resume carving up the glass sandwiches, telling Bloomberg that “there has been some damage, though not a fire or a collapse,” but both Hitachi and Toshiba will reportedly halt some assembly lines for around a month to deal with damages. It’s probably still too soon to talk about panel shortages — though they seem likely soon — but we’ll let you know how things progress.

Toshiba and Hitachi LCD plants damaged, will shut down for a month originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 17 Mar 2011 16:39:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |  sourceNikkei, Reuters, Bloomberg  | Email this | Comments

postheadericon LCD technology torn down and explained in the most lucid and accessible terms yet (video)

Look, we know you know all about LED backlights, light diffusion, subpixels, and the things that turn them on, but not everybody does. The humble LCD you’re most likely reading this on still retains a level of mystery about the nitty gritty details of how it works for the vast majority of its users, so here’s a terrific video breakdown of both its component parts and method of operation. Bill Hammack, a self-appointed Engineer Guy, takes us from the LED arrays that provide the light for most current LCDs, through all the filters and diffusers designed to make that light uniform, and into the ways thin film transistors make it possible for us to show moving color images of cats diving into boxes on such displays. It’s exciting, deeply nerdy stuff, and it awaits your audience after the break.

Continue reading LCD technology torn down and explained in the most lucid and accessible terms yet (video)

LCD technology torn down and explained in the most lucid and accessible terms yet (video) originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 17 Mar 2011 10:12:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |  sourceengineerguyvideo (YouTube)  | Email this | Comments

postheadericon MIT’s Junkyard Jumbotron turns your motley collection of devices into one large display (video)

Got a handful of mobile devices layin’ ’round when what you actually need is one large display? The kids at the MIT Center for Future Civic Media got you covered! The Junkyard Jumbotron, designed by Rick Borovoy, Ph.D. and Brian Knep, is an ingenious project that makes stretching an image across damn near any collection of displays with web browsers. When you assemble the displays (such as in the picture above), the Junkyard Jumbotron website will ask you to point them all to the same URL. This will cause each device to load the same QR code, which — once you snap a digital pic and email it to the project — will allow it to calibrate and stretch a JPEG across your assemblage. It certainly does look like something scrounged up at a junkyard, doesn’t it? Well, sometimes that’s part of the fun. Hit the source link to try it for yourself. Video after the break.

Continue reading MIT’s Junkyard Jumbotron turns your motley collection of devices into one large display (video)

MIT’s Junkyard Jumbotron turns your motley collection of devices into one large display (video) originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 14 Mar 2011 11:56:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink Gizmodo  |  sourceJunkyard Jumbotron  | Email this | Comments

postheadericon MIT’s Junkyard Jumbotron turns your motley collection of devices into one large display (video)

Got a handful of mobile devices layin’ ’round when what you actually need is one large display? The kids at the MIT Center for Future Civic Media got you covered! The Junkyard Jumbotron, designed by Rick Borovoy, Ph.D. and Brian Knep, is an ingenious project that makes stretching an image across damn near any collection of displays with web browsers. When you assemble the displays (such as in the picture above), the Junkyard Jumbotron website will ask you to point them all to the same URL. This will cause each device to load the same QR code, which — once you snap a digital pic and email it to the project — will allow it to calibrate and stretch a JPEG across your assemblage. It certainly does look like something scrounged up at a junkyard, doesn’t it? Well, sometimes that’s part of the fun. Hit the source link to try it for yourself. Video after the break.

Continue reading MIT’s Junkyard Jumbotron turns your motley collection of devices into one large display (video)

MIT’s Junkyard Jumbotron turns your motley collection of devices into one large display (video) originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 14 Mar 2011 11:56:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink Gizmodo  |  sourceJunkyard Jumbotron  | Email this | Comments

postheadericon JBL’s On Air Wireless AirPlay speaker dock gets official, unavailable to purchase

When we first peeked this AirPlay-enabled speaker dock, we were admittedly excited to see how things would turn out after it made rounds through the FCC. JBL just tossed up the splash page for the On Air Wireless speaker and we’ve gotta say — it looks to be a promising means of streaming your jams. The system connects wirelessly to your AirPlay-enabled Mac and iOS device on 4.2 or later and packs a screen that’ll display the track info of the song you’re rocking out to. What’s more, the rounded grill sports a dual alarm clock, FM radio, and a USB port for future firmware updates. As you might have surmised by now, the dock is not yet available for purchase and there’s no word on price. If you’re interested, though, be sure to hit the source link, sign up for more info and get ready to headbang this spring.

JBL’s On Air Wireless AirPlay speaker dock gets official, unavailable to purchase originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 08 Mar 2011 07:03:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |  sourceJBL  | Email this | Comments