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Posts Tagged ‘ir’

postheadericon MS applies for patent on ‘light-induced shape-memory,’ a touchscreen that could touch back

MS applies for patent on 'light-induced shape-memory,' a touchscreen that could touch you back

Touchscreens are selfish lovers, taking your gentle caresses and impatient taps without offering a hint of feedback to you. We’ve seen attempts to change that, like prototypes from Toshiba and Senseg that add a bit of texture to a touchable surface, but now Microsoft might be looking to bring such dynamic tactility to the one of the biggest touchable surfaces: Surface. A recent patent application entitled “Light-induced Shape-memory Polymer Display Screen” describes a technique for a display that uses infra-red light to detect touch, but also to “selectively change a topography of the topography-changing layer.” In other words: to make it bumpy or smooth. Certain wavelengths of light projected on the screen can cause areas of that topography layer expand or contract, which could finally mean all our cries for attention might finally be responded to in kind.

MS applies for patent on ‘light-induced shape-memory,’ a touchscreen that could touch back originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 29 Nov 2010 11:56:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink New Scientist, QikGlance  |  sourceUSPTO  | Email this | Comments

postheadericon MS applies for patent on ‘light-induced shape-memory,’ a touchscreen that could touch back

MS applies for patent on 'light-induced shape-memory,' a touchscreen that could touch you back

Touchscreens are selfish lovers, taking your gentle caresses and impatient taps without offering a hint of feedback to you. We’ve seen attempts to change that, like prototypes from Toshiba and Senseg that add a bit of texture to a touchable surface, but now Microsoft might be looking to bring such dynamic tactility to the one of the biggest touchable surfaces: Surface. A recent patent application entitled “Light-induced Shape-memory Polymer Display Screen” describes a technique for a display that uses infra-red light to detect touch, but also to “selectively change a topography of the topography-changing layer.” In other words: to make it bumpy or smooth. Certain wavelengths of light projected on the screen can cause areas of that topography layer expand or contract, which could finally mean all our cries for attention might finally be responded to in kind.

MS applies for patent on ‘light-induced shape-memory,’ a touchscreen that could touch back originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 29 Nov 2010 11:56:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink New Scientist, QikGlance  |  sourceUSPTO  | Email this | Comments

postheadericon Thinkflood survives recall, now shipping redesigned RedEye Mini

We’re guessing the past few months haven’t been the greatest at Thinkflood, who has been dealing with a nasty recall of RedEye Mini IR dongles. Based on information passed down from the company to us today, each one of the recalled units has been replaced, and now the redesigned / better-than-ever models are on sale for the same price as before. $49 nets you an IR adapter that plugs into your iDevice headphone jack, enabling your iPod touch, iPhone or iPad to control essentially any home entertainment component that understands Infrared. Crisis averted, as they say.

Thinkflood survives recall, now shipping redesigned RedEye Mini originally appeared on Engadget on Sat, 09 Oct 2010 06:20:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |  sourceThinkflood  | Email this | Comments

postheadericon iRobot patents "Celestial Navigation System" for the Roomba

While Roomba’s automated approach to floor cleaning might’ve been novel for its day, its random bumbling is starting to look dated, particularly in comparison to laser-guided, ultra smart vacuums like the Neato XV-11. Well, iRobot is naturally not going to take this lying down, and the company has received a patent for a new “Celestial Navigation System” based on IR beacons bounced off walls and ceilings that the Roomba can track and calculate its position from. It doesn’t sound as fancy as Neato’s completely self-contained system, and it’ll require the setup of multiple beacons throughout the house to make the bot self-sufficient, but we’re guessing it requires less processing and gadgetry on board to pull off — which hopefully means Roomba can stuff this into bots cheaper than Neato’s $400 XV-11. Mint, which was supposed to ship this summer from Evolution Robotics, uses a similar system to the one iRobot is proposing and has a rumored price of under $250.

iRobot patents “Celestial Navigation System” for the Roomba originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 30 Sep 2010 09:52:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink Robot Stock News  |  sourceUSPTO  | Email this | Comments

postheadericon Infrared laser shown to quicken heart rate, gives hope for ultra-small pacemakers

Here’s an interesting one. Just years after a researcher in Japan realized that lasers could stimulate nerves, a professor of biomedical engineering at Vanderbilt University along with cohorts from Case Western Reserve have found that the same is true with the heart. By using an Infrared laser on an early embryonic heart, tests were able to show that the muscle was “in lockstep with the laser pulse rate.” The crew also found no signs of laser damage after a few hours of experimenting, though obviously more extensive research would be required before any medical agency allowed such a device to be beamed underneath a human chest. The hope here is that this discovery could one day lead to ultra-small, implantable pacemakers, or better still, to “pace an adult heart during surgery.” There’s nary a mention of when this stuff will actually be ready for FDA oversight, but there’s a downright creepy video of it all in the source link. Consider yourself warned.

Infrared laser shown to quicken heart rate, gives hope for ultra-small pacemakers originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 16 Aug 2010 10:41:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink New Scientist  |  sourcePhysorg  | Email this | Comments