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Categories

Posts Tagged ‘military’

postheadericon Apple and Android get drafted, soldier-centric Army apps coming soon

If we referred to an Apple or Android army, you might assume we’re talking about a legion of brand-loyal fanboys, with which most Engadget commenters are intimately familiar. Defense contractors, however, are trying to turn the US Army into a lethal Apple / Android force with soldier-centric apps. Harris Corp. has a tablet app in the works that allows soldiers to control IP cameras on UAVs for more pertinent intel on the ground while simultaneously sending that information to command centers anywhere in the world. Meanwhile, Intelligent Software Solutions aims to bring mapping mashups to the battlefield (no purpose-built device needed) with an app that combines smartphones’ geolocation with historical data to show troops what’s been going down in the area — from IED explosions to insurgent arrests. Best of all, these apps lower training costs since most warriors are already fluent in Android or iOS and the consumer handhelds can be cheaply ruggedized to replace the more robust $10,000 units in the field today. Should protective measures fail, the devices’ (relatively) low replacement cost makes them “almost disposable.”

Apple and Android get drafted, soldier-centric Army apps coming soon originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 17 Mar 2011 02:34:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |  sourceComputer World  | Email this | Comments

postheadericon US Navy explains basic mechanical principles of a fire control computer — in 1953 (video)

Bits, bytes and silicon transistors? Boy, you have it good — back in 1953, state-of-the-art computers were made of gears, sprockets, chains and cams, and we trusted them to accurately wreck lives with ginormous naval guns. If you’re wondering how that could possibly work, you don’t have to go far — a series of seven videos after the break show you how it was done, and which might even ingratiate you with the grizzled old neighbor who desperately wants you off his lawn.

Continue reading US Navy explains basic mechanical principles of a fire control computer — in 1953 (video)

US Navy explains basic mechanical principles of a fire control computer — in 1953 (video) originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 14 Mar 2011 21:42:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink Boing Boing, Make  |  sourcenavyreviewer (YouTube)  | Email this | Comments

postheadericon DARPA working with Local Motors to crowdsource next-generation combat vehicles

A next-gen Hummer isn’t going to build itself, and these days we can’t trust our government bodies to come up with all the cool ideas. DARPA is looking for some help, and if you’re feeling up to it that can be you. Our favorite Advanced Research Progects Agency has selected a chassis from crowdsource car designers Local Motors (the same one found inside the company’s Rally Fighter) and is asking civilians of all shapes and sizes to figure out what shape and size the Experimental Crowd-Derived Combat-Support Vehicle will be. Sure, XC2V doesn’t quite roll off the tongue like “Flying Humvee,” but it sure does sound a lot more practical. If you want to have your say (and a chance at the $7,500 prize) you’d better hurry up, because submissions are due by March 3rd. Sadly, designs drawn in Crayon on the back of homework are not eligible, otherwise you’d all be fighting for second place.

DARPA working with Local Motors to crowdsource next-generation combat vehicles originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 04 Feb 2011 10:54:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink Wired  |  sourceLocal Motors  | Email this | Comments

postheadericon DARPA working with Local Motors to crowdsource next-generation combat vehicles

A next-gen Hummer isn’t going to build itself, and these days we can’t trust our government bodies to come up with all the cool ideas. DARPA is looking for some help, and if you’re feeling up to it that can be you. Our favorite Advanced Research Progects Agency has selected a chassis from crowdsource car designers Local Motors (the same one found inside the company’s Rally Fighter) and is asking civilians of all shapes and sizes to figure out what shape and size the Experimental Crowd-Derived Combat-Support Vehicle will be. Sure, XC2V doesn’t quite roll off the tongue like “Flying Humvee,” but it sure does sound a lot more practical. If you want to have your say (and a chance at the $7,500 prize) you’d better hurry up, because submissions are due by March 3rd. Sadly, designs drawn in Crayon on the back of homework are not eligible, otherwise you’d all be fighting for second place.

DARPA working with Local Motors to crowdsource next-generation combat vehicles originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 04 Feb 2011 10:54:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink Wired  |  sourceLocal Motors  | Email this | Comments

postheadericon AIRPrint performs ranged fingerprint scanning, won’t let the terrorists win

While ears may be the new biometric du jour, Advanced Optical Systems (AOS) is doing its best to keep fingerprints as the preferred method for identifying enemies of the state. The company has built a fingerprint scanner with the ability to accurately read a print up to two meters away, and our military views the system as a means to reduce the risk to soldiers at security checkpoints all over the world. The AIRPrint system is a significant upgrade over previous biometric security systems because it allows a person’s identity to be confirmed by military personnel from behind the safety of a blast wall or armored vehicle, which keeps our serviceman out of harm’s way. AIRPrint uses a source of polarized light and two 1.3 megapixel cameras (one to receive vertically polarized light and another to receive horizontally polarized light) in order to produce an accurate fingerprint. The prototype is able to scan and verify a print in under five seconds, but the device can presently only process one finger at a time, and that finger must stay a fixed distance from the cameras to get a precise reading. Despite these current limitations, AOS claims that soon the equipment will be capable of reading five prints simultaneously while a person is moving toward or away from the device. The system will be ready for market in the third quarter of this year, which is bad news for terrorists and soccer hooligans, but a windfall for Big Brother.

AIRPrint performs ranged fingerprint scanning, won’t let the terrorists win originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 18 Jan 2011 07:12:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink Technology Review  |  sourceAdvanced Optical Systems  | Email this | Comments